After the Cannons Fell Silent: The Gettysburg Civilians

After the Battle of Gettysburg, civilians coped with aiding thousands of wounded soldiers. Lawyer David Wills help create the National Cemetery to bury Union dead. Lincoln finished the Gettysburg Address while a guest at WIlls’ house.

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Baltimore in Blue and Gray

The first shots of the Civil War were fired at Ft. Sumter, SC, but the first blood was spilled in downtown Baltimore. A few days after the bombardment at Ft. Sumter, Union soldiers tried to march through the city to board south-bound trains. A crowd of angry civilians blocked their way. The “Pratt Street Riot” left 16 people, both military and civilian, dead. A strategically important, Southern-sympathizing, Union-occupied city in a border state, Baltimore experienced the Civil War with an intensity unknown elsewhere. Martial law prevailed; travelers and troops, supplies and spies passed through the port and train stations. Families worried about their sons and fathers in the armies – sometimes on both sides.

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