Three Titanic places to visit 100 years after sinking

The movies, legends, stories and remnants of the RNS Titanic, the heralded doomed ocean liner operated by the White Star Line, continue to surface today, 100 years after it sank 2:20 a.m. April 15, 1912.

Iceberg ahead. Walk a Titanic deck at a museum in Pigeon Forge, Tenn. or Branson, Mo.

Iceberg ahead. Walk a Titanic deck at a museum in Pigeon Forge, Tenn. or Branson, Mo.

Instead of replaying the 1997 James Cameron movie starring Leonardo DiCaprio and Kate Winslet which mixed fictional and true stories and poured several minutes of water across the screen or seeing the new 3D version, go where the ship has become part of the culture or where it has gained new life as a walk-through replica that is filled with memorabilia.

One destination is in Canada. The other two places are in the United States.

Halifax, Nova Scotia

The supposedly unsinkable ocean liner was completed in 1911 by the Harland and Wolff shipyard in Belfast. It left Southampton on April 10, 1912. But when it hit an iceberg 375 miles south of Newfoundland on the fourth day out, the closest land with transportation connections was Halifax, Nova Scotia.

Thousands of visitors visit grave stones for Titanic victims in Halifax, Nova Scotia

Thousands of visitors visit grave stones for Titanic victims in Halifax, Nova Scotia

This year, the province’s capital city of Halifax is commemorating the famed disaster with costumed interpreters and special programs from April 3 through Oct. 31, 2012.

This is the destination to go when interested in recovery details, cemeteries with Titanic sections and a maritime museum that has a movie, relics and precise information about the ship, its passengers, route and the sinking and recovery time-line.

The bonus is that the combination of Halifax and Nova Scotia make an interesting and fun destination.

 

In the United States

Even though you can walk decks, climb the grand staircase, tap out an SOS and feel the cold of an iceberg, you won’t have to worry about these two “Titanic” ships floundering and sinking at sea. The ocean liner look-alikes are scale-down replica museum attractions in Pigeon Forge, Tenn. and Branson, Mo.

Climb the Titanic's grand staircase at the Pigeon Forge or Branson Titanic Museum Attraction

Climb the Titanic's grand staircase at the Pigeon Forge or Branson Titanic Museum Attraction

Look past both towns’ over-the-top carnival atmosphere because their you-are-there style museums are not merely worth a visit, but frequently sold out days in advance.

Titanic Museum Attraction owner John Joslyn co-led an expedition to the site of the sinking that became the basis of “Return to the Titanic-Live” a two-hour TV documentary. Joslyn also has also amassed one of the largest collections of items from the Titanic and has researched the passengers and crew.

Either Pigeon Forge or Branson would be the destination to go to “experience” the Titanic, see memorabilia, artifacts and photos and hear about who was aboard the ship.

The Pigeon Forge location is the largest Titanic Museum Attraction but Branson is also excellent. The bonus is that either town is a vacation destination with a wide range of accommodation and restaurant options.

Details: Reservations are highly recommended, particularly during 2012 when several commemorative events take place. Toll free is 800-381-7670. Pigeon Forge advance reservation: Adult $21.38 + tax, children ages 5-12 $11.14 + tax, family Pass of 2 adults and 4 children $58.80 + tax, children under 5 free. Branson advance reservation:  Adult $20.68 + tax, children 5-12 $10.77 + tax, family pass for 2 adults, 4 children $60.56 + tax and children under 5 free.

Titanic Museum Attractions are at 2134 Parkway, Pigeon Forge, TN and 3235 76 County Blvd and Hwy 165, Branson, MO.

Titanic photos compliments of Titanic Museum Attractions

Halifax cemetery photo by Jodie Jacobs

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